How I survived Carbon Monoxide poisoning

This is my yearly reminder for others to get a CO detector.

I survived Carbon Monoxide poisoning in 2005 – and it was extremely lucky as I did NOT have a CO detector.

It started with me feeling extremely drained and tired. This was over some period of time. I recall being out, and feeling energetic. I was excited to go home and get a lot of things done. But when I returned, I just couldnt move. I layed on my bed and felt ill. Super tired, and stomach nauseated but I really didnt feel like I was sick with the flu.

A friend called and I said, “I think I have carbon monoxide poisoning”.


I guess it was my experience in college working for two gas detection companies which left me with enough sense to know that the signs were there. My friend screamed at me to get up and open a window. I slept that night with the window open even though it was January 9th and very cold outside.

The next day I went to work and was falling over sideways and bumping into things. After work I drove to the hardware store and could not keep in my lane.

When I got the detector, I called my friends who lived down the street to talk to me as I entered the house.

It went off as soon as I put the batteries in. I tried to reset to be sure it wasn’t just a first time use thing, but it kept going off.

I walked down the hill to my friends’ house, and I was almost falling down as if I just drank ten shots. I guess college was good for more than just the co-ops, so that I could make this analogy. But I could hold my own back then, and I was sober, so I knew something was definitely wrong.

When I got to their house my speech was slurred and I wasn’t using the correct words.

My friend went up and the detector was indeed going off, it wasnt just my fumbling with it. They called the firestation, and took me back up to meet the firemen.

The chief was a childhood friend and he had a detector that he was using to go through the house.

In the meantime, the paramedics came and my oxygen level was lower than it should be. 91 I think? (meanwhile, I had been out of the house all day at work and had just returned to try out the co detector.)

While I was taken by ambulance, the gas company and firemen found my furnace had a cracked heat exchanger.

I was extremely luck, please, if you do not have a CO Detector go and get one.
List of CO Detectors on Amazon

I send this out yearly to try and warn and help others.
One year someone wrote back and said, please do not send me spam.
When I replied that this actually happened to me, Judy Herilla (Lipinski) then they took it seriously.

I will not stop.
Last year, two people wrote back to let me know how they had gotten detectors and were saved.

PLEASE. If you do not have a Carbon Monoxide (CO) Detector – GET ONE.

This isnt just for those of us in winter climates, and not just for old appliances.

There are lots of sources of CO:
Brand new houses, anything gas, including furnaces, stoves, water heaters, connected garages, living in a house connecting to another.

And if you have one – change the batteries. If you think they are still good you can use them elsewhere.
Its not a life threatening situation if they run out of juice in your toys.

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